San Francisco Civil War Round Table Meeting
Thursday 21st March 2013
at the United Irish Cultural Center
2700 45th Avenue, San Francisco
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Entree Choices

Breast of Chicken Marsala @ $32.00
or
Corned Beef and Cabbage @ $32.00
or
Vegetarian Pasta @ $29.00

Entrees are accompanied by  salad, fresh vegetables, potatoes, rolls and butter,
dessert, coffee (regular or decaffeinated), or tea.  

[ Note: the above prices include gratuity, sales tax and room charge.]

Please mail a check, indicating your choice of entree, to
Joan Keller, 515 42nd Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94121-2530
to arrive before Monday, March 18th.
(Phone: 415 752 4156)
Please make checks payable to "SF Civil War Round Table."

6:00pm  no-host cocktails
6:45pm  dinner
7:45pm program

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Visit us on the Web at
www.sfcwrt.com
                              The Battle of New Market
                                           presented by
                                            Phil Gioia
On 15 May 1864, a battle took place between Union and Confederate forces at the
sleepy little farm town of New Market, Virginia. With one shoulder on the Shenandoah
River and the other on the Blue Ridge Mountains, New Market was the setting of one of
the most unique battles of the American Civil War.
In that springtime, a Union expeditionary force under Union General Franz Sigel was
advancing up the Valley, intent on destroying its sources of food, fodder, and forage
for the Confederate armies.
In 1864, more a high school than the world-famous college it has become, The Virginia
Military Institute (VMI), had sent its entire cadet corps on a grueling four-day, 85-mile
forced march north, up the Valley turnpike. At New Market they had joined with
Confederate General John Breckenridge’s seasoned Confederate veterans.
As a last-ditch effort to hold against what appeared to be an imminent Union victory,
Breckenridge committed his only reserve: the 247 boys of VMI. In one of those
moments in military history which can only result from will and courage, the cadets
frontally attacked a full battery of Union artillery, overrunning the guns, breaking the
Union line, and forcing Sigel to withdraw in defeat.
12 boys were killed and 48 wounded – a grim casualty rate of 24 per cent. In doing so,
the cadets gained everlasting fame for themselves and VMI, the only American military
college authorized by Congress to carry a battle streamer on its Regimental colors,
inscribed ‘NEW MARKET - 1864’.

Phil Gioia grew up as an ‘Army Brat’ on posts in the United States, Japan, and Italy. He
comes from a long tradition of military service to our country: his father was a career
Army officer who served in OSS in Italy during World War II, and a relative has served
as an officer in Infantry or Field Artillery in every conflict from the Spanish-American
War through Operation Iraqi Freedom.
He was commissioned in the Regular Army from Virginia Military Institute in 1967. He
served ten years as an Infantry officer, in command assignments in Airborne and
Airmobile infantry units in the United States and the war in Vietnam. He was a Combat
Infantryman, Ranger, Pathfinder, and Parachutist.
He also holds a Masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown University, and an MBA
from Stanford University.
Following business school, he worked in the financial sector for Goldman Sachs and
Morgan Stanley in New York and San Francisco, focusing on emerging-growth
technology. Phil’s firm, Pathfinder Partners, is located at the Presidio of San Francisco. It
advises US government clients in the defense, intelligence and national security sectors on
technology, products, and opportunities which assist them in better performing their
missions.
Phil is a writer and lecturer on topics of military history, has been published in various
military history periodicals, and has appeared as a commentator on several military
history and technology series, on the History Channel and the Military Channel.
He is also an advisor on matters of military history to the Presidio Trust, created by
Congress, which manages the historic Presidio of San Francisco